Residential Solar Has Changed Forever: Now Taking Orders for the Newest Sunny Boy TL-US!

From on 05/14/2013 in Category Industry News with 101 Comments

SMA America has been overwhelmed by the positive feedback and enthusiasm within the solar industry for the new Sunny Boy TL-US inverter and we are delighted to announce that we’ve officially begun taking orders for this revolutionary inverter! 

Watch this short video and learn about all of the superior benefits of the Sunny Boy TL-US, which includes:

>          Maximum power production

>          Flexible design and simple installation

>          Secure Power Supply

>          Innovative communications tools

Installers can place orders for the new Sunny Boy TL-US through their local dealers and distributors. Click here to find an SMA distributor in your area.

We would love to hear your thoughts. Comment below and let us know which new feature you are most excited about! 

 

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101 Comments

  • avatar

    Bill Steagall

    05/16/2013 at 7:23 am

    Can I buy a Sunny Boy TL US at a regional forum ?

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Melissa Womack

      05/16/2013 at 9:06 am

      Hi Bill,

      We are excited to see you at a SMA Regional Forum! We do not offer products for purchase at these events. Click here to find a distributor in your area: http://goo.gl/RjiD1.

      Cheers- Melissa

      Reply »
  • avatar

    rob hilbun

    05/28/2013 at 10:19 am

    UUUUUUUUUhhhhhhhhhhh cool its about time and of course where is my 120/240V

    Reply »
  • avatar

    Andy Clemans

    06/02/2013 at 8:01 am

    We just installed our first two TL’s this past Friday.

    The initial feedback is that although the inverters are what we want in a TL inverters as far as performance, at first glance the physical design of the inverter leaves much to be desired. Because of the disconnect offset from the wall and the two separate input locations for DC and AC, the conduit situation becomes and unsightly mess when you have multiple inverters. I would love to see a picture of a TL install with multiple inverters to see where we missed the boat.

    Thanks!

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Melissa Womack

      06/03/2013 at 9:41 am

      Hi Andy,

      We would love to see an image of the installation you mentioned and provide some suggestions for your next TL-US installation. Please email me directly at SocialMedia@SMA-America.com

      Regards,
      Melissa

      Reply »
      • avatar

        Mark Claussen

        07/20/2014 at 4:59 pm

        Recently finished install of a 3900 watt PV system using the Sunny Boy 4000TL-US. I’m currently working to maximize the potential for off-grid use during our hurricane season in South Texas – if we have an extended outage (likely if a direct hit). I have two sets of four deep cycle 155 AH batteries – one installed in my golf cart and one set as a spare next to the inverter system. My goal is to best use the SPS to be able to recharge one set every day – preferred to be the installed set, using the standard 15 amp 48 volt charger (result is a “portable” 48 volt DC and/or inverted 120 volt AC at night). My fear is surge at plug-in/restart will kick off the SPS. Question is has anyone been successful in using a UPS to act as a “buffer” to smooth out surge and momentary loss of full sun? If so, how would this be designed and also how to determine if the UPS can be modified sine or not (cost!)? The SPS seems to have lots of locked potential – can it be economically utilized?

        I do plan, upon an extended outage, to reconfigure the panels and add a small charge controller for the other set of batteries to keep them in good shape as backup (and other usages). This will drop the rated PV system to the Sunny Boy to 2800 watts. Hopefully, this will not be a problem for the SPS. Again, simply trying to maximize the utility of the existing panels/inverter.
        Thanks,
        Mark

      • avatar

        Justin Dyke

        07/21/2014 at 9:48 am

        Hi Mark,

        Your question s is a very common. Let’s start with your “loss of full sun” concern: since your 3900W array will be powering a 1500W inverter (the output of the SPS), there is very little to worry about with cloud cover or other environmental effects. In fact, the SPS in our Solar Academy has provided full power with a module temperature of 60 degrees Celsius and an irradiance of 150 w/m2.

        People we talk with have had successes with UPS devices, which will actually “feed” the surge. Most UPS devices operate in this way- they do not provide surge capability, but they will allow a surge to pass along with the SPS power to enable something like a refrigerator to start. We are working on a whitepaper to address some of the loads that can be run by the SPS, however, we recommend talking to the device manufacturers about their capabilities. While there are many third-party devices that could enhance the SPS’s capabilities, our Service Line will probably not approve of any unconventional customization and be mindful of violating the inverter warranty. Here is the model number of a UPS device that had success starting a 3 year old refrigerator: http://goo.gl/n4cX3m. I must put a disclaimer out there about this product however- it was one installer and results may vary.

        Best of luck,
        Justin

  • avatar

    Joel Parks

    06/05/2013 at 9:52 pm

    no problems with our SMA 2500U installed in 2004, but if it ever fails I’ll be back to look into the 3000TL/US. Glad to see the “Secure Power” feature, it would be nice if you supplied a little more technical info. Looks like I just run an extension cord from the “dedicated” outlet to the input on my transfer switch, then at night fire up the Honda EU2000i, or the Converdant Plug-out Island if the Prius is in the driveway (see http://www.converdant.biz/plug-out/plug-out-island-kit-prius-2kva-120v-60hz-psw/ ).

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Joel Parks

      06/05/2013 at 9:55 pm

      er, ignore that comment about more technical info. Just saw the downloads tab

      Reply »
      • avatar

        Melissa Womack

        06/06/2013 at 10:44 am

        Hi Joel,

        Sounds like you found the technical data you were looking for! Just in case anyone else would like to download the file, here is the link to the data sheet: http://goo.gl/oISf1

        Sunny Regards!
        Melissa

  • avatar

    richard

    06/11/2013 at 12:40 pm

    Very good.–Can’t wait to get started. but then by next spring when I’m hoping to break ground you’ll probably have even better inverters. One can only hope.

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Melissa Womack

      06/11/2013 at 2:44 pm

      Thanks Richard! Send us a message when you break-ground and we will make sure you are using the latest SMA inverter technology and the best inverter for your project! Regards, Melissa

      Reply »
  • avatar

    Harish

    06/18/2013 at 7:28 am

    Good one plz send detailed product information.

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Melissa Womack

      06/18/2013 at 8:35 am

      Hello Harish,

      Please download detailed product information here: http://goo.gl/9Cy8p

      Regards,
      Melissa

      Reply »
  • avatar

    John Payne

    06/25/2013 at 3:26 pm

    Wonerdul feature- another step towards achieving energy independence.

    Reply »
  • avatar

    Jeremiah Rohr

    07/10/2013 at 9:28 am

    What happens on a partly cloudy/sunny day when the grid is down? Will this source keep cutting in and out if there is not enough irradiation to keep the inverter going and would I have to keep turning the switch “on” each time it reset?

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Melissa Womack

      07/16/2013 at 10:20 am

      Hi Jeremiah,

      If the load pulls more current than the inverter can create, based on the weather conditions, the SPS will automatically disconnect from the loads and retry to connect 20 seconds later. It will continue to do this until there is more sun or the load is reduced. You do not need to toggle the SPS switch.

      Thanks,
      Melissa

      Reply »
      • avatar

        Jeremiah Rohr

        10/18/2013 at 12:46 pm

        Does the SPS socket have continuous power to it when the grid is up and running? Can I keep something plugged into it all the time or would I have to go plug say a battery charge or ups into it when the power grid went down? Can it be used as a regular outlet even if a power failure is not happening?
        Also, will it keep going after the grid comes back up after a grid power failure? Or first thing in the morning when the sun comes up but the grid is still down?

      • avatar

        Melissa Womack

        10/18/2013 at 2:33 pm

        Hi Jeremiah,

        The SPS socket is not active when the grid is up. Per code, it’s only active when the grid is down and the socket has been manually activated. It will remain activated if the grid comes back during the day but will automatically cycle off at night (with the loss of DC power). Normal operation will resume again the next day and the socket will be inactive once again.

        As for what you can plug into it, the socket can provide up to 1,500 W of daytime power. You can use this power for any purpose – charging a phone, laptop, UPS, etc. You can get as creative as you want as long as you don’t exceed the technical limitations of the SPS.

  • avatar

    Bob

    07/21/2013 at 12:47 pm

    Hi Melissa,

    Is the Secure Power feature available on any TL inverters larger than 5k? I’m just in the bid process for solar system on my home which will probably be 7 or 8.

    Thanks,
    Bob

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Melissa Womack

      07/22/2013 at 2:00 pm

      Hi Bob,

      The Secure Power Supply feature (SPS) is currently available only on the Sunny Boy 3000TL-US/4000TL-US/5000TL-US line of inverters. I will look into the larger “classic” version Sunny Boy 7000TL-US/8000TL-US inverters and see if they are planning on adding the feature on the new generations. I will let you know as soon as I find out!

      Best,
      Melissa

      Reply »
      • avatar

        Bob

        07/22/2013 at 4:47 pm

        Thanks Melissa. It’s such a cool feature. Hope it’s in the big ones soon.

      • avatar

        Shane

        03/09/2014 at 9:19 am

        I would recommend 2 inverters in this case. I have 2 of them for a larger system which helps you overcome the 1500w limitation by offering 2 backup circuits instead of one (one circuit from each inverter)

      • avatar

        Justin Dyke

        03/10/2014 at 10:42 am

        Hi Shane – I agree, this is a great solution for getting additional power in the case of a grid failure! Also, I want to remind folks that the Secure Power Supply outlets cannot be wired in parallel because the voltage waveforms are not synchronized. In a case like this, you’d need to wire two separate, switched outlets for the SPS.

  • avatar

    jim

    08/22/2013 at 9:27 pm

    I just had my us 5000tl installed. Really like it. How can i see the performance online? what steps do I need to create graphs or to check its daily production? What are all my options to track its performance.I see the display reading production but how do I log that on a spreadsheet.

    Thanks
    Jim

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Melissa Womack

      08/26/2013 at 4:53 pm

      Hi Jim,

      We are excited you installed solar, thank you for choosing the Sunny Boy 5000 TL-US inverter! SMA offers free PV monitoring via our website, http://www.SunnyPortal.com. This site allows daily / weekly / yearly performance tracking of your system, and offers detailed reporting functions. You can access the information from anywhere, SMA even has an app for your smart phone! Registration of your PV plant is simple, if you have Webconnect installed on your inverter you would simply sign-up and follow the “Plant Setup Assistant” steps. Contact your installer and see if the Webconnect feature was already included with your system. If not, it is simple to add to the inverter after commissioning. You can read more information about Webconnect here: http://goo.gl/MIvoZ9.

      Best,
      Melissa

      Reply »
  • avatar

    Ralph

    09/29/2013 at 12:14 pm

    I’ve had the SB 2500U since 2003. Great product and although it failed a few years ago SMA was great about shipping me a replacement for a few hundred bucks. So I’m a big SMA fan and I’m planning to expand my system and add the 5000TL. I really like the idea of the secure power supply feature but I’m wondering if it has the capacity to handle start-up loads like that from a refrigerator? I’ve used a small 1600W ‘running’ / 2000W ‘peak’ DC generator Invertor to power both my refrig and my freezer during a power outage as it had the capacity to handle the startup draw from both (staggered) with no problem. Can the sunny boy handle something like this as well? If so, I’m SOLD!
    Thanks!

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Greg Smith

      09/30/2013 at 11:35 am

      Hi Ralph,
      There is no surge capacity for the Secure Power Supply (SPS) – if you pull more than the available power from the unit, the inverter will disconnect the SPS, wait 20 seconds and then attempt to reconnect.

      It will continue to do this until:
      1. Loads are disconnected
      or
      2.More sun becomes available to support the connected loads (up to 1500W).

      Thanks,
      Greg

      Reply »
      • avatar

        Ralph

        09/30/2013 at 12:58 pm

        Hi Greg,
        Thanks for the information. Since all of the units could output > 1500W, is there a reason why 1500W was selected as the cutoff? Code requirement?
        It seems the units could handle more (as they output 3-5Kw normally), and since one of the most necessary items people have to run in the event of a power failure is their refrigerators, I’d think SMA would be able to SELL a really nice solution here if there were either a higher running limit or some surge capacity built in. I realize ‘it is what it is’ so perhaps this can be considered an enhancement request.
        Thanks!

      • avatar

        Greg Smith

        10/02/2013 at 4:29 pm

        Hi Ralph,

        You’re welcome! Since most electronic equipment is sensitive to voltage fluctuations, it was an engineering decision to choose 1500W, that way the inverter can utilize the capacitor bank to create a stable voltage for the SPS socket.

        Best,
        Greg

  • avatar

    shay ohrel

    11/05/2013 at 6:13 am

    What kind of premium does this add to pricing? Great idea!

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Melissa Womack

      11/07/2013 at 5:07 pm

      The premium is negligible. The additional components required for the SPS (e.g. the switched outlet, wire) are commonly found and inexpensive. The benefits far exceed any marginal additional cost. All other features such as Webconnect, dual MPPT, AFCI, etc. come integrated.

      Reply »
      • avatar

        Shane

        03/09/2014 at 9:23 am

        Web connect was not integrated/included with either of my 2 inverters

      • avatar

        Justin Dyke

        03/10/2014 at 3:21 pm

        Hi Shane – the Webconnect card is available as an added factory-integrated option or as a retrofit at a later date. Sorry for any confusion! More information on Webconnect can be found here, in case you’re interested in doing the retrofit.

  • avatar

    Alfred Kirsch

    11/07/2013 at 3:33 pm

    I need to know if I can connect two equal sets of 6 panels each inseries directly to the Sonny Boy 3800US Inverter without a combiner ? Do I need a red, black, white wire disconnect at the main service disconnect of the PV system

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Melissa Womack

      11/08/2013 at 10:03 am

      Hi Alfred,

      Please contact our Service Line at Service@SMA-America.com or by calling 877-697-6283. They can talk you through your particular scenario in detail. Thanks!

      Reply »
    • avatar

      Shane

      03/09/2014 at 9:26 am

      The included DC disconnect has two sets of terminals, one for each of the 2 supported arrays. The included monitoring display alternates the read out for each array.

      Reply »
  • avatar

    Greg F

    11/15/2013 at 2:02 pm

    Hi, how far from the inverter can you install the dedicated outlet? I assume the closer to the inverter the better, but what is the recommended maximum distance?

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Melissa Womack

      11/15/2013 at 2:47 pm

      Hi Greg,

      Using the specified 14 gauge wire and considering Code best practices, with three percent voltage drop you’re looking at about a maximum of 75 feet. For optimum use of labor, materials and performance — you are correct — mounting the SPS outlet close to the inverter is best.

      Reply »
  • avatar

    Rick Noden

    11/22/2013 at 11:33 am

    I am comparing a 5.4KW 2- Sunnyboy 3000TL 20pc 270 Watt /panel system with a 5.4KW 20DC SEoptimizer, same 20pc 270 Watt/panel, SE6KW inverter system on a 19 degree uniform no shade roof. The optimizer mfrs say I will get up to 25% more energy with the optimizers. What do you”SMA” say? I cannot make a direct comparison using data on each system. I know I will get the most per panel if cloudy or some get dirty etc. but what about sunup/down and marginal days I know the optimizers will go very low and keep each panel to their max where string cant.
    I love the idea of 1500 watts of sunny backup power…esp with using the 2 SB3000TLs…I get 2.
    Also I assume I can compare the monitoring side by side to know if I have problems with one group of 10 or the other. Since their is no individual panel tracking. Or is there more tracking than I think.
    Will be committing to one or the other soon.
    Thanks

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Melissa Womack

      11/22/2013 at 3:18 pm

      Hi Rick,

      Choosing an inverter should entail comparing a variety of features. While third-party testing has not typically supported the +25% power optimizer claim under most conditions, even taken at face value, power optimization is only one thing to consider when choosing an inverter. The TL-US series is equipped with dual maximum power point trackers and features SMA’s Optitrac Gloabl Peak shade mitigation technology, making it exceptionally effective at producing power even under the most complicated situations (multiple orientations, shading, etc.) but it’s also available with Zigbee wireless capability for future integration into home energy management systems. And, even though SMA is well known for making the most reliable inverters on the market, it’s still backed by SMA Service — the industry’s most preferred service organization, according to IHS Research. Lastly, as you mentioned, it’s the only inverter available with the ability to provide daytime power without batteries in the case of a grid outage. We hope you consider all of these characteristics to ultimately determine what you think is best for your particular needs. Good luck with the project!

      Reply »
      • avatar

        Rick Noden

        11/24/2013 at 8:26 am

        Where can I get a direct comparison of the 2 systems. Or just more details and data of what……………. “dual maximum power point trackers and features SMA’s Optitrac Gloabl Peak shade mitigation technology, making it exceptionally effective at producing power even under the most complicated situations (multiple orientations, shading, etc.)” …….I read that everywhere but cannot find details and data to compare.
        Thanks

      • avatar

        Melissa Womack

        11/26/2013 at 1:09 pm

        Hi Rick,

        To our knowledge no one has done a side-by-side comparison of the specific inverter models you mentioned. As previously stated, however, with any comparison you do you’ll want to make sure you take a holistic approach. Almost every PV application is unique so you’ll need to use the right tool for the job as defined by your specific criteria. Production data should be weighed against reliability, serviceability, levelized cost of energy, and non-data driven features which may be of value like limited power during grid outages or the ability to connect to a future home energy management system.

        To address your question further, here are a few resources available on our website.
        OptiTrac Global Global Peak paper: http://www.sma-america.com/en_US/news-information/resource-center/optitrac-global-peak.html

        Secure Power Supply video (how it works): http://goo.gl/OHNvJy

        You also may want to attend an upcoming free webinar hosted by the SMA Solar Academy on the TL-US series : http://goo.gl/HRpl9l

        Thanks again!

    • avatar

      Shane

      03/09/2014 at 9:33 am

      Rick,

      I live in Southern California. My friend and I both installed systems, I opted for SMA’s 3000TL-US (my system has 2) while he went with solar edge.

      The efficiency of the 2 systems is most identical, the power optimizers, in my opinion as a state licensed electrician who Self installed the system, are just one more point that can fail in a system that will be exposed to extreme temperatures, wind and water.

      Keep in mind we rarely get clouds, so if blue skies are common where you are then this is really a non issue, enjoy your new SUNNY BOYS with backup power 😉

      Reply »
  • avatar

    Kris

    11/28/2013 at 8:47 pm

    Hey Mellisa,

    I am sourcing inversters for 100kW commercial flat roof pv project. Its in North Africa with 240V 50hz AC. Any recommendations on which sunny boy setup works best for this project?

    thx in advance
    K

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Justin Dyke

      12/04/2013 at 1:52 pm

      Hi Kris, thanks for asking!

      SMA America only sells inverters that comply with 60Hz grids, however there are a few resources for international grids that use 50Hz. The SMA corporate website has a handy-dandy product finder that can help you zero in on the best SMA tool for your job. The site can be found here: http://www.sma.de/en/solutions/medium-power-solutions/product-finder.html

      To obtain a direct sales and support contact that can help you source the inverters for your project, enter your information in our international contact form and the appropriate product specialist will contact you. http://www.sma.de/en/contact/contact-form.html

      Best of luck!

      Reply »
  • avatar

    Peter

    12/30/2013 at 6:53 pm

    1.Do the string sizes need to have the same characteristics on the dual input 5000TL?

    2.Will 13 LG 280watt panels with 39Voc push the limit of 600volt max of the 5000TL?

    ie… 13panels x 39Voc= 507volts ….507volts x 1.18 low temp correction= 598.26 volts?

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Justin Dyke

      01/07/2014 at 9:48 am

      Hi Peter,

      Thanks to the dual MPPT, the strings can be different length and even with different modules. Each string is tracked independently of one another.

      When using our Sunny Design system to match your modules to the Sunny Boy 5000TL-US, the array is undersized compared to the inverter. That module setup will only put 3.64kW into a 5000W inverter, but since we don’t know your location the design software doesn’t know what temperature derating to apply to the design. I recommend you speak one of our Service Line representatives at 877-697-6283 to discuss this in more detail.

      Reply »
  • avatar

    Rick Kapur

    02/04/2014 at 10:51 pm

    Hi there,

    My installer has been trying to find a SMA Sunny Boy 3800 TL-US for me, and is coming up empty.

    Can you pls guide us where we can get one asap; we need it in San Jose California

    Thanks

    Rick Kapur
    503 475 4564

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Justin Dyke

      02/05/2014 at 2:28 pm

      Hi Rick,

      I saw you also emailed me. I’ll answer to both to make sure we get this resolved. Have you gone through our Authorized Distributors page?

      Best,
      Justin

      Reply »
  • avatar

    Don Boccio

    03/08/2014 at 12:07 pm

    I have a question about your display, I notice that the icon for the square panels toggle from left to right. On one side the panel displays a Voltage (around 450V), the other side is always zero amps, volts and watts. My green light stays on during sunlight and seems to show a constant output about 2.5 kw. Is this normal? or should I have my installer Solar Alliance of San Diego check it?

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Justin Dyke

      03/10/2014 at 10:28 am

      Hi Don – are you using the dual maximum power point tracking feature? If not, then the unused MPP will not show any voltage or amperage and those are the zeros you’re seeing. However, if you are using the dual MPP feature then I recommend you contact our Service Line at 877-697-6283 and they can figure out why you’re getting those zero readings.

      Reply »
  • avatar

    Mark Claussen

    07/27/2014 at 5:55 pm

    Reference post of 7/20/14 that was answered by Justin Dyke of SMA
    Justin; I was able to test the SPS on my 4000 TL-US this weekend using my Club Car golf cart charger with the following results;
    1. The location is South Central Texas on a mostly sunny day. The time was 1:30 PM CST. My ~4000 watt system (14 – Solar World 280 mono panels) was outputting 3100 – 3300 watts max, dropping to ~1200 under clouds.
    2. The 48 volt charger kicked on with no problems – under full sun. The inverter wattage read around 600 watts with the charger showing around 10 amps. It continued to operate for about an hour (I had to leave). The charger “kicked off” once – but only for a second or so – don’t know if the SPS actually reset or not – seemed much to quick!
    3. An interesting observation was that 10 amps (48 volts) is quite low for the initial charge on my batteries – in fact when I plugged the charger into a regular outlet – immediately after this “test” – the amps jumped to the normal 13+ and stayed there. The SPS amperage continued to drop during the “test” to around 8 amps – with a inverter reading of 560 watts.

    It certainly appears that the SPS will adequately charge my 4 – 155 AH batteries on a sunny day with no problems – and the initial surge current does not seem to be a problem. I’d be interested if you can explain why the cart charger runs at lower amperages on the SPS as compared to a regular 120 volt outlet (grid of course). This cart does have a computer control system that regulates the charge.

    Mark

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Justin Dyke

      07/28/2014 at 1:04 pm

      Hi Mark,

      This is great information and sounds like your testing went well. If your charger had tripped the over-current protector in the SPS then it would have automatically re-connected in 20 seconds, which could have been long enough for changes in cloud cover to allow the charger to start again.

      Regarding your question: the SPS is a load-driven device that also tries to maintain a stable voltage. It will sacrifice current to achieve that stability since varying voltages are what tends to wear our electrical components over time.

      Thanks again,
      Justin

      Reply »
      • avatar

        Mark Claussen

        07/29/2014 at 6:25 pm

        Justin,
        I don’t believe the SPS ever tripped as the cart charger only “blipped” to zero amps and then came immediately back to the ~ 10 amps – in less that a second.

        So, my decision now is the best reconfiguration during an extended outage:
        Option 1: 3 panels (of the 14) to the Midnite Kid to charge the spare set of 4 – 155 AH batts, remaining to keep SPS on line to use cart charger (and maybe other Li-ion batt chargers). This would leave a 6 panel feed and a 5 panel feed to the Sunny Boy. Would this cause any imbalances?
        Option 2: 6 panels to the Midnite Kid to maximize the direct charge capabilities. This maximizes the Kid capacity, but will limit the Sunny Boy to 2 strings of 4 each of the SolarWorld 280 mono’s feeding the Sunny Boy. Don’t want to rewire if possible, but my inclination is to try this option first during an extended outage (not planning on doing any rewiring for “testing”)

        When I have more time, I’ll try a more controlled test of early (or late) sun that has a consistent wattage of around 2000 watts grid-tied – to see how the cart charger handles the normal variations of a partly cloudy day. Do you think that would simulate a 8 panel feed to the SPS? I’ll eventually hook up my LI-ion chargers with a surge strip and “push the limits” of your SPS! BTW the LI-ion system will be emergency lights, radio, tools, etc,etc. I use a Craftsman C3 set as they have quite a variety of compatible items.

        I’d sure like to hear of others that are gaining experience in use of the SPS!
        Mark

      • avatar

        Justin Dyke

        07/30/2014 at 3:35 pm

        Hi Mark,

        It’s hard to offer a lot of advice on these scenarios without having access to the equipment. Is your system a ground mount? Also, before you do any testing with your equipment, I highly recommend you use our Sunny Design program to input your system configuration and begin seeing what can and can’t be done without risking safety or damaging any equipment. We use this program often to help with system configuration and answer questions.

        After discussing your two scenarios with the Solar Academy team, here’s what we can tell you:

        For the first scenario, having imbalanced strings is not a problem providing they are on different channels when they enter the inverter. The TL-US has two channels and can support different string lengths, however having only five modules on one would, by our estimates, be the minimum to create enough voltage to run the inverter. Also, the voltage minimum for the SPS to power on is 200, so there is a concern that you won’t have the voltage needed. This is because the start up voltage for the SPS is separate from the inverer and does not have a voltage boost stage when in SPS operation.

        For the second scenario, once again there is an issue with voltage being too low to start the inverter. Two strings of four won’t produce enough voltage while, given this would require rewiring, one string of eight would work just fine.

        We’re always on the lookout for people using SPS and trying to learn from it!

      • avatar

        Mark Claussen

        07/30/2014 at 6:19 pm

        Yes, I’m using the two strings of 7 each It is roof mount, but that does not really present a problem and all wiring is accessible (mounted on a barn style storage shed roof). I’ll check the SMA design program, but I understand that going to the 8 panel feed to the Sunny Boy will require all series wiring – not a real problem actually. Good to know that the 200 volt minimum for SPS startup is required – that will dictate all series panels for option 2 anyway. Is it concerning that the 5 panels on one of the strings for option 1 might be below this minimum also? The Voc of these panels are 39.5 volts – is that the determining voltage?

        I’ll certainly feed back any results I get from further “testing” of the SPS in the current 7/7 parallel configuration.

        Mark

      • avatar

        Justin Dyke

        07/31/2014 at 9:27 am

        Hi Mark,

        That’s great that you’re able to re-wire the modules so easily. We’re really interested to learn how everything works once you’ve found an ideal solution and used it a few times.

        For the minimum voltage, given your Voc then five modules should work, but it would likely be the minimum to achieve start up voltage. Like I said before, though, that is based on our math here and not actual testing with equipment that’s in outside conditions like yours. But if you create a series of eight modules, then this isn’t an issue at all.

        If you have other questions or what to send us any photos of your SPS setup, please email socialmedia@sma-america.com, we’re always excited to get real-world feedback from folks like you

      • avatar

        Mark Claussen

        09/01/2014 at 1:57 pm

        Justin – this is a copy of what I have reported on the Northern Arizona Sun and Wind forum – seems to be really good one!

        Additional Sunny Boy 4000 TL-US inverter data;
        48 volt Club Car charger test;
        Charger consistently starts on the SPS and registers about 13 DC amps and about 700+ watts on the inverter screen. Normally the DC amps will drop to 8 amps or less fairly quickly depending upon state of charge of the batteries
        Testing on a rainy day, the total wattage of my panel system was about 670 watts on the inverter screen (grid-tied) and was slowly rising as the clouds were moving out. I shut off the grid disconnect and started the SPS at this wattage. The charger kicked in at about 700 watts registering on the “stand-alone ops” status – with a reading of 13 DC amps, quickly settling at 11 amps on the charger. The inverter continued to show 700 watts and started cutting back as the DC amps started coming down. When I shut down the SPS and reconnected the inverter to the grid, the wattage reading on the inverter screen was around 800 watts. This indicates to me that the SPS can start a golf cart type charger with little “surge” capacity required and can consistently charge the batteries with anything above 800 watts available from the PV panels. This would of course vary with the type of charger, but again appears that the computer controlled type charger of the typical club car will work very well with the Sunny Boy SPS.

        Testing the SPS with a 1850 watt rated hair dyer;
        Testing in bright sun with 3000+ watts on the inverter screen, with little or no cloud cover, I disconnected the grid and turned on the SPS. I then plugged in the hair dryer with the following results;
        Hair dryer setting on “cool” – fan only – wattage on “stand-alone ops” was 250
        Hair dryer setting on “warm” – wattage on “stand-alone ops” was 950
        Hair dryer setting on “hot” – both the hair dryer and the SPS would shut down – no wattage reading.

        I’ll likely continue testing to determine the maximum “stand alone ops” I can get by using a combination of the hair dryer on the cool and warm settings with the golf cart charger – more later!

      • avatar

        Justin Dyke

        09/02/2014 at 8:40 am

        Hey Mark,

        This is great stuff, we’re always interested in the rainy day and cloudy capabilities people experience with SPS. It’s great to see you’re still getting good power during non-optimal conditions. Keep up the great work and let us know if you have any questions along the way!

        Best,
        Justin

      • avatar

        Mark Claussen

        09/10/2014 at 7:07 pm

        Follow-up on SPS testing;
        Full sun testing – Cart charging 12 amps (48 volts) – 715 standalone watts
        Added Low fan hair dryer – 795 watts
        low fan, warm hair dryer – 964 watts
        high fan, warm hair dryer – 1383 watts (9 amps on charger)
        low fan, high hair dryer – SPS kicks off (this is a 1850 watt hair dryer)
        Comments; Under cloud cover, the cart charger will lower it’s charging amps and corresponding “standalone Ops” watts to as low as 460 watts, then would come back up to 523 watts as the cloud cover lifted. Cannot explain this, but it consistently happens. Also, the charger will click off on occasion, but comes back on within a few seconds – not the 45 seconds or so when the SPS is overloaded.

        Again, appears the SPS is very well suited to charge a rather large set of 4-12V deep cycle batteries in the Club Car Golf Cart using the charger designed for the cart. Due to continuing downward amperages as the batteries get more fully charged, it could take most of the day to fully recharge depleted batteries – especially if there is substantial cloud coverage.

  • avatar

    Michael

    08/19/2014 at 2:12 pm

    I never use even strings of 7. If you look at the efficiency curve the higher range of voltage is best but make sure you temperature correct. For my designs I always string between 10 to 14 for 60 cell modules and 8 to 12 72 cell modules. Also note that the max recommended dc input power is only 106% of the rated ac output. Again, refer to the efficiency curve.

    Reply »
  • avatar

    Lloyd

    09/11/2014 at 7:12 am

    Was looking for the quote that was referenced in my email. . . . I am really slow at this email / internet stuff but could not find a reference to the estimate.

    Thanks for your help.

    Reply »
  • avatar

    lloyd

    09/11/2014 at 7:19 am

    Found the quote, sorry to bother you . . . I am not very bright . ..

    Thanks, What kind of storage do you suggest if I wanted to go to a 10 kw system, and how much roof space would the panel take up?

    Have been considering this for years and am still just looking at the cost/vs benefit of installing a sun powered system that can run some of the house while power is out. Am on well and septic so when we are without power we are without water.

    Thanks
    Lloyd

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Justin Dyke

      09/11/2014 at 8:47 am

      Hi LLoyd,

      We always recommend sizing a residential solar system based on you energy demands. Have you looked over your recent energy bills to see how much power your using to determine if 10kW is the best size for your house?

      Regarding roof space, that’s hard to answer. Solar panels come in a wide range of sizes, both in terms of power they can generate and the space they’d occupy on a roof. If you live in an area of consistent power outages, then you might be best suited to install a hybrid system using a Sunny Island and a battery bank to ensure you can power your well pump. The best place to start might be contacting an installer close to your area for an estimate to see what the costs would be.

      Hope this is helpful,
      Justin

      Reply »
  • avatar

    chris

    09/25/2014 at 1:58 pm

    after looking at some of the documentation of this family of inverter, i wish there was an installation video, especially regarding the electrical connections, is there 1 possible

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Justin Dyke

      09/25/2014 at 2:00 pm

      Hi Chris,

      We do have a video for the installation, click here.

      If you have any other questions, please let me know.

      Best,
      Justin

      Reply »
  • avatar

    […] We offer SMA products for the residential, commercial, and off-grid segments of the solar industry. Sunny Boy TL-US This revolutionary home energy solution delivers unique features that are not available from any other inverter brand. It produces more power, it features superior monitoring and it can even keep the power on when the electrical grid goes down. SMA has pioneered the first and only Secure Power Supply (SPS), which will continue to deliver power from your solar system to your home when the sun is shining, even when the power goes out. High performance solar power systems for home, business, government, utility, commerical property, and large-scale solar projects | SolarWorld. Now Taking Orders for the Sunny Boy TL-US | SMA Inverted. […]

    Reply »
  • avatar

    […] Now Taking Orders for the Sunny Boy TL-US | SMA … – SMA America has been overwhelmed by the positive feedback and enthusiasm within the solar industry for the new Sunny Boy 3000TL-US/4000TL-US/5000TL-US inverter and …… […]

    Reply »
  • avatar

    […] Now Taking Orders for the Sunny Boy TL-US | SMA … – SMA America has been overwhelmed by the positive feedback and enthusiasm within the solar industry for the new Sunny Boy 3000TL-US/4000TL-US/5000TL-US inverter and …… […]

    Reply »
  • avatar

    […] Now Taking Orders for the Sunny Boy TL-US | SMA … – Recently finished install of a 3900 watt PV system using the Sunny Boy 4000TL-US. I’m currently working to maximize the potential for off-grid use during our …… […]

    Reply »
  • avatar

    Terry

    01/03/2015 at 3:43 pm

    My Sunny Boy shuts down (is off) at night (dark), then restarts (is on) in the morning (daylight). I don’t recall it doing that before. It acts like it doesn’t have power to maintain during the night, I would think it would take that power from the grid?

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Justin Dyke

      01/05/2015 at 11:24 am

      Hi Terry,

      Which model Sunny Boy do you have? If you have a Sunny Boy TL-US, with the light up display screen, have you tapped it to engage the back light and that’s when you notice that it isn’t working at night? If that’s the case, you’ll need to contact our Service Line at 877-697-6283 for additional help.

      -Justin

      Reply »
  • avatar

    Terry

    01/06/2015 at 9:58 am

    Hi Justin,
    First of all I would like to preface my reply by thanking SMA for this blog and their customer service. I’m very disappointed in the company that designed and installed my system. Not only did they charge me an exorbitant amount to install, they left me with many important parameters on the Sunny Island, which I also have, setup very wrong causing battery overheating, equalization problems, and etc. When I questioned them about it I was told to call SMA which I did. Now I have, I think, Sunny Island working properly. This is the first issue I have had with Sunny Boy.

    Yes I have Sunny Boy SB4000US and knew about tapping on the case to light up the back light for the display. Nothing happens until daylight when the solar panels start producing a little power, then all seems fine.

    I will call customer service

    Terry

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Justin Dyke

      01/06/2015 at 1:03 pm

      Hi Terry,

      Thanks for the kind words and we’re truly sorry to hear you’ve had such issues with your installer! It sounds like things are better with your Sunny Island, but please don’t ever hesitate to call the Service Line with questions, especially when it comes to Sunny Island parameters and battery management.

      As for your Sunny Boy, it’s indeed best to call the Service Line so they can walk you through some troubleshooting on the phone for real-time assistance. Hopefully this can be quickly and easily resolved.

      Best,
      Justin

      Reply »
  • avatar

    Terry

    01/06/2015 at 4:18 pm

    Hi Justin,

    Indeed, I called customer service and talked with I think his name was John. He informed my with the model of Sunny Boy that I have it does shut down the display with no panel power. He also cleared up a few more questions that I had. Good job SMA, all is well.

    Terry

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Justin Dyke

      01/06/2015 at 4:24 pm

      Hi Terry,

      Thanks for following up! Glad to hear things are getting resolved, it’s my hope you’re feeling better about your system since getting some of these kinks worked out.

      All the best,
      Justin

      Reply »
  • avatar

    Bob

    04/03/2015 at 9:31 am

    I’m designing an unbalanced system (315 W modules) with 6 modules on one string and 11 modules on another string (due to shading on the 6 module string). Will use the SB 5000TL-US-22 (240V) inverter with both A and B channels active (6 on A, 11 on B). Two questions: (1) Do I need to install a blocking (isolation) diode on each string? (I don’t think so) and (2) Do I need at least 200 V on both channels A and B to turn on the SPS feature, or will the SPS work with at least 200 V on just one channel? Thanks!

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Justin Dyke

      04/06/2015 at 12:00 pm

      Hi Bob –

      Great questions, here you go:

      #1 – You’re right, there is no need for a blocking diode.

      #2 – You don’t need 200V on each, however should the smaller channel not reach the 200V then it won’t contribute to the SPS power. This doesn’t cause much concern given the size and potential output of your larger channel, which could easily supply 1,500 watts for SPS operation.

      Best,
      Justin

      Reply »
  • avatar

    Omar

    05/21/2015 at 12:25 am

    Hi
    1- are you produce 50Hz models ?
    2- what if I need to use SPS all the time for off grid applications and need to operate my load only during the day ?
    3-what if I need more than 1500w ?
    4- we need to be your distributor in Iraq , what is your requirments.

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Omar

      05/22/2015 at 1:52 pm

      in case of no grid power available , and I need to operate the on grid inverter during the day , can I use 20w solar module + small charge controller + 18Ah battery and 150w inverter to generate 220v ,50Hz and then feed this signal to the grid tie inverter instead of grid power , don’t you think that will operate the inverter ?

      Reply »
      • avatar

        Justin Dyke

        05/26/2015 at 11:52 am

        Hi Omar – We do not recommend trying a setup like this for an inverter that is supposed to be grid tied. In a situation like this there is no safety from the inverter to prevent back feed if there aren’t enough loads. That would cause a safety issue with overcharging the batteries or worse. Have you looked into Sunny Island systems that are AC coupled?

    • avatar

      Justin Dyke

      05/26/2015 at 10:38 am

      Hi Omar – thanks for reaching out. I’ll respond here for your same questions elsewhere in this thread.

      1 – Yes, they are sold throughout the world. Our 60Hz models are for North America only.
      2/3 – SPS is only availalbe on our 60Hz models in North America so any applications in Iraq would not have that feature on the similar Sunny Boy TL-US. At this time we are not going to offer SPS on those inverters, but they can be used with our Sunny Island for off-grid power and battery management.
      4 – you’ll have to contact your sales representative for information on becoming a distributor.

      Best,
      Justin

      Reply »
  • avatar

    Globalbob

    06/02/2015 at 7:08 pm

    If I put panels on the east and west side of my house do I need to enable optitrac? There are no trees to shade the panels on either side. The panels on the west wlll be shaded when the sun come up and the panels on the east will be shaded when the sun goes down.

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Justin Dyke

      06/03/2015 at 3:15 pm

      Hi there –

      Depending on your inverter’s age, it might have OptiTrac enabled already. Having the feature turned on, if your inverter doesn’t already, won’t harm production and can only help increase it. We recommend having it on even if it might only help gain back small amounts of power during early/late times of day.

      Best,
      Justin

      Reply »
  • avatar

    Daniel

    08/20/2015 at 10:05 am

    Most conventional mono- crystalline PV modules have outputs that degrade minimally over time, usually less than .7 of a single percent per year, thus quality PV module makers have a power output warranty that supports this module lifecycle limitation. part of this degradation is due to degradation of the optical quality pottant between the glass and cells and the other major part is what happens at the boundary between the silicon cell and the optical quality pottant. So about .0035 or.35 % of the string voltage is lost (or less) per year. I have a question (for an example), employing 16 conventional 60 cell – 275 watt module(s) with a rated Vmp voltage of 31.0 each, On a TL inverter using 16 modules, with a 11 module string on MPPT channel (1) and 5 modules on MPPT channel (2), I have 2 questions regarding this set-up.
    The use of SunnyDesign Web says, no problem, but on the 5 module string, I arrive at a working voltage of 155vdc on a roof on a spring or fall day. Although from the SMA x000TL-US-22 spec sheet, I am informed that the start voltage is 125vdc, I know the lower end of the MPPT voltage window is 175vdc. I was told that the MPPT channels function independently. With 5 modules on the 2nd MPPT channel, I am well below this value, which leads me to believe this MPPT channel of 5 modules is successfully “PASSING” current, but I do not see how it could be impedance matching or max power tracking?
    What say you?
    Using a 16 module PV investment (limited available roof space) I would think that a 9+7 module configuration – would be better, because now on the lower voltage string, 7 x 31.0vdc = 217 volts and that is well above 175vdc, (the lower end of the MPPT voltage window being 175vdc). On a hot roof in the Summer in New Mexico, I have personally seen module temps on a metal roof @ 130+F, and the Vmp voltage of hot module near this temp would be around 28.3 volts, 7 of these would still be about 198 vdc (still above 175vdc), but only a 5 module string would be 141.7 well below the 175 min . voltage window limit for MPPT tracking,

    These two different scenarios (employed within SunnyDesign Web), that is (9+7) or (11+5) show very little difference in annual production? What’s the news that’s fit to print, what’s going on here?

    Question 2,
    As PV voltage does degrade over time, with a 5 module wired in series string voltage (mpp) of 5 x 31 = 155vdc, each year we’ll lose approx. .46 to .54 volts(oc) per string/year. After some number of years this will also drop the 5 module string operating voltage even lower and more hours of each and every subsequent year, it will be further and further away from the 175vdc lower limit on MPP tracking that 5 module string?
    granted this mechanism might take over 38 years to drop the string voltage below the inverters “Turn-on” voltage.
    I have never understood the puzzling, but granted “wonderful new string sizing modularity” that the 2 channel TL-22’s have given us, & can find nothing in print. Thanks

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Justin Dyke

      08/21/2015 at 2:34 pm

      Hi Daniel – This is a great question.

      Sunny Design is ranking the designs based on efficiency or production (you choose which metric), and often “unbalanced” strings are the result. The program has all of the efficiency curve data for each inverter, and how the curves vary with DC voltage and power level. It crunches these numbers to create its energy yield estimate over the annual calculated operating environmental range.

      As you noted, the predicted yield difference is generally quite small due to shifting one module from input A to input B. A more “common sense” recommendation is choose whatever would make the install smoothest (equal length strings should reduce the chance of mis-wiring) This methodology would lean toward a design with two strings of 8 modules.

      Also, the start voltage for the Sunny Boy TL-US with Secure Power Supply is 150V, not 125V. It will operate down to 125V once it starts producing power. As you note, to have a buffer against future module voltage degradation, it is prudent to choose more than the absolute minimum string length.

      Reply »
  • avatar

    Mark Jenkins

    12/14/2015 at 12:47 pm

    Question about the 1500W SPS system. What is the minimum amount of Solar Power required to generate the 1500W ? Is it 100% efficient? On a cloudy day, what is the minimum power the SPS will allow before it shuts off, maybe 1000, or 500 W ?? I live in POrtland, OR and in the winter, we have mostly cloudy days and I’m not to sure if the SPS will work here in the winter.

    thanks

    Mark Jenkins

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Justin Dyke

      12/14/2015 at 2:20 pm

      Hi Mark,

      Our SPS is a demand-driven device, so it will only generate as much power from your PV array as needed for the loads it’s powering up to the 1,500 watt limit. Most residential solar systems are significantly larger than 1,500 watts, for example the smallest inverter with SPS is 3,000 watts so it’s ability to provide 1,500 watts via SPS during a grid outage is highly likely. There are some instances with very heavy clouds where irradiance levels could be low enough to not produce the full amount though it will always produce as much as possible.

      Best,
      Justin

      Reply »
  • avatar

    Terry

    12/27/2015 at 12:37 pm

    I have a Sunny Island as well as Sunny Boy. My system has never been tested with a generator charging batteries as well as running the critical loads. My backup generator is a bit short in power so I lowered the Max Charge current to 25A, at 48V that would make it 1200W? I think my generator can handle that extra load as long as everything doesn’t try to start all at once, I have 5 refrigeration units all on backup?
    I understand I should not let my lead acid batteries get below SOC of 50%? What should I expect the actual charge current should be at various SOC? It might be wise for me to not let the SOC go as low as 50%?
    Your thoughts
    Terry

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Justin Dyke

      01/04/2016 at 11:38 am

      Hi Terry,

      Yes, 25A at 48 V would be 1200W (plus some to account for less than 100 percent efficient charging) into the batteries.

      With regards to battery info, you should contact the manufacturer as SMA does not have that information. If you are interested in the charge current the SI provides, we could send a page from the manual that shows the behavior in the various charging modes, but it does not have explicit numbers. Email SocialMedia@SMA-America.com and we can send that over.

      And we stress strongly that the generator needs to be able to handle all loads that will be running. If the loads tax the generator too much, its voltage can sag. If it goes too low, the Sunny Island will disconnect and try to power the loads – this could lead to rapid discharge and then the Sunny Island will go into battery protection mode and the loads will be shut down.

      Best,
      Justin

      Reply »
      • avatar

        Terry Robinson

        05/07/2017 at 4:13 pm

        Hi Justin,

        We had a multiple day power outage a while back. We are retired and home most of the time so we went to battery backup within a few minutes, backup is manually switched.

        With no solar avail. The average battery drain is 36%/24 hours, 12% of that is running T.V. Sat, lights, and etc. in the evening, about 6 hours.

        Running the generator recharges the batteries at 3%/hour including powering all critical loads.
        Looks like if we were not home and were on battery backup all the time we would be good for 48 hours and still have the batteries at around 50%

        My question is. Would it be better to leave the critical loads on backup mode and allow the grid to keep the batteries charged when it is up? We could then use the generator to recharge the batteries when the grid is down. This way when the grid goes down we would have no interruption in power while we go on and off backup? Also if we were not home during an outage our 5 refrigeration units would still be running.

        Terry

      • avatar

        Mike

        06/02/2017 at 9:53 am

        Interesting question, Terry. If you are solely using the generator to keep the batteries charged, you can decide if the cost of diesel/propane vs electricity plus the convenience of automatic switchover is worth it. Also, if you make the jump, you should ensure the backup system you go with can load shed or has a low voltage cutout. If there was a long outage and you were away (I am assuming the refrigeration units may be decent sized loads and not sure if you are independently managing them during an outage), you don’t want your batteries to drain down to very low charge. The Sunny Island has built in load shed relays and three battery protection modes, so if you do make the switch, the Sunny Island is worth a hard look.

      • avatar

        Terry Robinson

        06/04/2017 at 11:15 am

        Reply to Mike’s reply of 6/2/2017

        I suspect my question was confusing?

        1) I have a Sunny boy connected to the grid and to the Sunny Island, this powers my critical loads. When the grid power goes off I manually switch to battery backup.
        2) When battery SOC gets too low I fire up the generator and manually switch Sunny Island from the grid to the generator until SOC gets back to the high 90s% then switch back to the grid and turn the generator off. When the grid comes back on it will recharge the batteries via the Sunny Island. Also I suspect if it is sunny the solar panels will help?

        My concern is that if I were not home for a while with the grid down my critical loads will not be powered and when going to battery backup all 5 freezers + other stuff will try to start at the same time, a big load for sure.

        My question is why not leave my critical loads on backup so when the grid goes down there will be no disruption. Sunny Island will, in normal (grid up) times, keep the batteries charged. I’m wondering if there is a good reason not to do this?

        Terry

      • avatar

        Mike

        06/07/2017 at 9:20 am

        Apologies Terry, I did misunderstand the question. If I may ask, why are you preventing the Sunny Island from automatically powering your protected loads when the power goes off? This is what it was designed to do – so you don’t have to worry about being home when the power goes out. Also, the generator can be automatically started (and stopped!) by the Sunny Island – is there a concern that is stopping you from allowing this? Most definitely the solar will help SOC when off grid – the Sunny Island will allow the PV to produce fully when the grid is gone. The Sunny Island can even prevent the PV from overproducing if the grid is gone, when there are no loads and the batteries are fully charged. It is a VERY smart device. And even the 4500W unit can provide 11000W for 3 sec so your freezers can start up. In my opinion, there is no good reason not to utilize all of this functionality of the Sunny Island.

  • avatar

    james rudolph

    11/22/2016 at 5:18 pm

    Aloha,
    How far can the SPS outlet be away from the SMA 3000w TL inverter?
    Doe it have to be under or right next to it? Any limitations or code restrictions?

    Reply »
    • avatar

      Jessica

      12/07/2016 at 3:59 pm

      Hi James. Our service team says there wouldn’t be a limit as long as you follow the electrical code. For further info please reach out to the service team service@sma-america.com or 1 877-697-6283. Thank you!

      Reply »
  • avatar

    Manny

    03/14/2017 at 5:01 am

    Hello I live in the US But I am looking for a 5 to 10 KW grid tied inverter that is either 50hz or 50/60hz. I am also interested in looking at the unit that is combined with the battery.
    Can you please let me know where to go to buy a 50hz or 50/60hz unit here in the States. Thanks you.

    Reply »
  • avatar

    Terry

    06/11/2017 at 8:23 am

    Reply to Mike, 6/7/2017

    Hi Mike, to answer your question on why Sunny Island is being operated manually is that’s the way the company I hired to do the system designed and installed it! In hindsight it’s obvious they didn’t understand how Sunny Island worked. Not only did they charge me a fortune to install it they left many of the parameters setup wrong. For instance they set max charge current to 231A when my batteries have a max of 50A. You guessed it, when Sunny Island tried to recharge the batteries after a power outage the batteries over heated and Sunny Island shut everything down to protect the batteries. When contacted the solar guys said to contact SMA which I did. Your service techs helped me get everything setup right. Yah I know, the solar co. should have fixed it but I no longer trusted them to do it right.

    I don’t mind being able to go directly to the grid with my critical loads in case of a Sunny Island failure but you answered my question. I should leave my critical loads connected to Sunny Island.

    As for the generator, its only 3500W and not able to power all critical loads and the well pump at the same time. It also isn’t setup for auto start. It does work fine for the critical loads and well pump separately so I’ll leave it manually setup, that way I can decide when to run the generator.

    Thanks for your help, question answered
    Terry

    Reply »

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